Do They Treat You Like A Superuser?

“A good workman is known by his tools”
— proverb

The process of getting admin rights as a corporate software developer is definitely on a spectrum. Over the last 20+ years, I’ve written code for more than ten companies and boy, do their policies differ!

In one case, I had full admin rights from day one. In more typical cases, I had to start a workflow to request admin rights which would arrive within hours to days. In one extreme case, I had to do an online training about the dangers of working with admin rights before I could start the workflow. After I passed the exam and once my request was approved (7 days later), I would be granted admin rights only for a limited number of time (180 days at most). Even worse — the online training course would need to be taken again as well!

Let’s meditate a little bit on this latter case. Too me, it’s an utter catastrophe. As software developers, we constantly need to maintain and tweak our PC, our beloved toolbox. We need to install or upgrade development tools, device drivers and the like, sometimes just for the purpose of experimentation and learning. What if I wanted to switch to a newer version of g++ one day only to find out that my ‘sudo’ rights had expired? Sure, I could start the workflow again, wait a couple of days for approval, but why? Such processes are nothing but a nuisance that break developers’ flow and inspiration while not adding any real security.

A software developer is not a regular user — a software developer is a superuser, literally. If a company has to have their software developers take training courses to ensure that they don’t work in a root shell all day they should not have been hired in the first place. Doesn’t it border on insulting if you learn in such a training that you should not open email attachments from unknown senders, especially while being logged-in as root? You don’t say!

If a company doesn’t give you unlimited superuser rights within a couple of hours, you’re definitely not treated like a superuser. You’re rather treated like a regular office worker who has no clue about how computers work, let alone computer security.

It’s not just about wasted time. It’s about lack of empowerment and trust. But it’s mainly about a missing software culture: are you viewed as precious human capital that develops top-notch software products which will make the company thrive, or are you rather viewed as a schmuck that poses an severe risk to the company?

A company with good software culture understands the chief need of creative makers, which is: working on interesting projects in a frictionless, libertarian environment where they can spend most of their time doing what they love most: craft exciting software.

Restricting software developers in terms of admin rights is just one problem of companies lacking good software culture, but it’s symptomatic. While such shops might manage to lure in great creators, they will certainly not be able to retain them in the long run.

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